The paper adopts a case study approach to understand the long-term success of Turkish contractors in the fractured markets of MENA and CIS.

Turkish contractors compete highly successfully in international markets, especially in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and Commonwealth Independent States (CIS). They are adept at positioning and adapting themselves in turbulent markets with shifting opportunities. In contrast, much of the literature on competitive positioning is characterised by assumptions of economic and political stability. Such assumptions may well be justified in the markets of North America and Western Europe, but they have little resonance with the regions targeted by Turkish contractors. For Turkish firms, notions of semi-predictable ‘trends’ have been replaced by stark discontinuities.

A case study approach is adopted to understand the long-term success of Turkish contractors in the fractured markets of MENA and CIS. Attention is given to their initial success in Libya in the 1970s, followed by their subsequent involvement in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and CIS. However, there is little research on how Turkish contractors decide which markets to compete in and the way in which they organize themselves to be successful in conflict zones. The case study combines archival evidence together with an analysis of the grey literature. Findings illustrate how the case company’s development path has been aligned in governmental policies and broader contextual change. 



Read the next page in this section