This paper examines knowledge sharing and application among a major client, consultants, main contractors and subcontractors in a programme supply network for a multi-billion dollar national infrastructure programme of megaprojects

Cost and value management has focused upon collaboration and knowledge management in recent years to i) increase effectiveness and deliver value, ii) improve efficiency and reduce costs. Attention has been given to the project level. Less attention has been paid to programme management and the supply chain network. This paper examines knowledge sharing and application among a major client, consultants, main contractors and subcontractors in a programme supply network for a multi-billion dollar national infrastructure programme of megaprojects.

The interpretative methodology analyzes 20 interviews of 6 organizational members in a supply network supported by cognitive mapping. The findings show the supply side is failing to meet the increased demands of complex projects. A lack of investment, commitment and cultural leadership was found, hence the over-reliance on individuals and teams to take responsibility for knowledge sharing and application. The barriers to improvement include a lack of strategic front-end development on the client side, and scant programme management on the supply side. The conceptual outcome is a demand and supply side programme structuring and set of cultural norms that points to behavioural learned helplessness.



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