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Built Environment Journal

21 MAY 2019

Built Environment Journal: June-July 2019

Barney Hatt, RICS Editor

Barney Hatt

Editor, Built Environment Journal

RICS

Despite continued fatalities in domestic fires, the construction industry seems reluctant to fit sprinklers in new-build properties.

In this issue of Built Environment Journal, a surveyor describes his own experiences following the loss of his children in a house fire, and explains how vital fire suppression systems can be. There is also coverage of ductwork ventilation, and why good design can reduce what would otherwise be a significant fire hazard in kitchens.

Of course, fire safety requires an holistic approach to managing risks, and other articles look at how it can involve many specialists throughout an asset's lifecycle, as well as new regulations to be introduced by Holyrood following a review of Scottish standards. Speaking of standards, RICS has now published Countering bribery, corruption, money laundering and terrorist financing, and this issue also introduces this mandatory professional statement.

Meanwhile, climate change is making us all consider how we prepare for an uncertain future. The latest projections estimate that the UK will see its highest sea level rise in London, where there could be an increase of up to 1.15m by 2100, and we look at how flood risk management in urban design and planning for the capital are having to transform to respond to the changing climate. There is also a reminder that APC candidates must have a solid understanding of the Sustainability competency so they can help the profession face these growing challenges.

Technology features in this edition, too: we explain why installation of ground-source heating and cooling systems must be carried out carefully to ensure they function correctly, and reflect that, although intelligent asset data can be used in facilities management to enable efficient maintenance, barriers to the adoption of building information modelling persist.

Materials in focus this issue include limework and concrete, while our regular materials information sheet for building conservation professionals introduces structural timber.

Elsewhere, we show how negotiating dilapidations depends as much on people skills as it does on surveying expertise, while the winner of the 2018 RICS Young Building Surveyor the Year award explains why surveying offers such a rewarding career choice.

We hope you enjoy the new issue. As always, I welcome your thoughts and ideas about the sector and the journal itself, so please do get in touch with me.

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Barney Hatt, RICS Editor

Barney Hatt

Editor, Built Environment Journal

RICS

Barney works with professionals to produce building surveying, building control and interdisciplinary material that supports surveyors in the technical and professional aspects of their day-to-day work.

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